Smart Speaker | Amp Teardown and Potentiometer Problem

Here are images of the teardown:

A couple of things to note: I over heated the pads when removing the gain pot and lifted a trace by accident. Instead of soldering directly into the lug hole, I just tied directly to the resistor that is in series with the pot signal.

I also am also not going to be able to use the digital pot I have been working with so far. Note the image that shows the pot with a resistance of 50k, and the one I’ve been working with is 10k.

I’m going to order a pair of these, and many of these to try and solve the bluetooth static problem.

Hey! This post was written a long time ago, but I'm leaving it up on the off-chance it may help someone, but proceed with caution. It may not be a good idea to blindly integrate this code or work into your project, but instead use it as a starting point.

Smart Speaker | Power System Proof Of Concept

Here’s a video:

This is very simple. Basically this whole thing will work like:

12v Battery -> Amp (5v Regulator) -> Arduino & Bluetooth & Cellphone Charger

I may have to add a separate linear regulator in order to get less noise on the bluetooth as seen in the video.

 

 

Hey! This post was written a long time ago, but I'm leaving it up on the off-chance it may help someone, but proceed with caution. It may not be a good idea to blindly integrate this code or work into your project, but instead use it as a starting point.

Smart Speaker | Proximity Potentiometer Working Prototype

A direct follow up to this post: http://192.168.1.37/?p=984


First, here’s a video:

I got the digital potentiometer working! It was very simple using the SPI library built into the Arduino software. All you have to do is address the chip and then write it a value between 0 and 255 to set the resistance value. Here is the code for this version, I’ve cleaned it up a bit since last time:

If you have questions about the code please leave it in the comments.

Hey! This post was written a long time ago, but I'm leaving it up on the off-chance it may help someone, but proceed with caution. It may not be a good idea to blindly integrate this code or work into your project, but instead use it as a starting point.

Smart Speaker | Proximity Potentiometer Proof of Concept

New project! First, here’s a video:

This is the proof of concept for the volume control of the speaker system. In it’s final form, this sensor will be exposed to the outside and will allow users to control the volume without opening the system, preserving the fidelity of the inside. For example, imagine a user is at the beach and wants to change the volume but they have sand covered hands or wet hands. This system will solve that problem.

The sensor is the Sharp GP2Y0A41SK0F. Here are some very very macro shots of sensors inner workings.

But now for what you came here for, the code. It’s very poorly commented as this is just a prototype, but it’s better than nothing. As this project progresses I’ll posted updated versions of this code.

This demo also relies heavily this shift register. I still haven’t decided if i’m going to use a buzzer to interact with the user or if I’m going to use these bar graphs.

Here are some photos of the board if you want to try and work out the schematic:

Hey! This post was written a long time ago, but I'm leaving it up on the off-chance it may help someone, but proceed with caution. It may not be a good idea to blindly integrate this code or work into your project, but instead use it as a starting point.

Using Arduino Micro as a USB keyboard for Raspberry Pi

Greetings from WPI! Here’s a video:

Desperate times call for desperate measures. I recently found out that a club at my school is essentially a hackerspace equipped with 3D printers so I could finally print enclosures for the PiPlanter and the DSFU. But that means I would need to finial the designs for both of them. I needed to find a way to interface with this thing here. So being the idiot that I am, I forgot a USB keyboard, I forgot an analog video cable, I forgot a monitor for the pi and forgot to update the Pi to the latest Raspian build.

What I did bring was an Easy Cap Capture Card in addition to my standard idea-kit which among other things consists of an Arduino Micro, some buttons, some resistors, and wire.

Essentially all I needed to do was connect the Pi to the EasyCap, and be able to send 4 different phrases to it over the keyboard. I needed to be able to send ‘pi’,’password’ (not my actual password), ‘ifconfig’ and enter. I realized that I could easily send this data to the Pi via the Micro as it has the Keyboard. functions built in.

As you can see in the video it worked! And I’m kind of stunned that it did. I can now SSH into the Pi.

Here’s the code for the Arduino:

Thanks for Reading!

Hey! This post was written a long time ago, but I'm leaving it up on the off-chance it may help someone, but proceed with caution. It may not be a good idea to blindly integrate this code or work into your project, but instead use it as a starting point.

Plane | Ground based system all working! [Demonstration]

Pretty big day for me today. Here’s a video:

I’m pretty proud of this one, the only problem of this is that the l298N get’s too hot, you can see in the pictures that I’ve installed a makeshift heatsink but it still get’s really hot:

Motor Driver 1

I also installed the 5v@3a regulator I mentioned in the last post, here are some pictures:

 

Here’s the vehicle code:

Here’s the controller code:

I’m verrry proud of the progress thus far. As for next steps, I need to lock down the vehicle circuit into a soldered perf-board, and I need to come up with a better power solution for the controller. Thanks for reading!

Hey! This post was written a long time ago, but I'm leaving it up on the off-chance it may help someone, but proceed with caution. It may not be a good idea to blindly integrate this code or work into your project, but instead use it as a starting point.

Plane | Working handshake code demo

First off, here’s a video:

If you’re a long time follower of the blog, than you may notice that it looks like I’m backtracking here. Let me go over the differences between the two systems I’ve developed.

The one I “finished” a few months ago can be found here. While the code is “good” and it works well for what it does, there are a few inherent problems with it. The first being that it has to have a computer to be used. The second being that the computer running the intermediate program has to be extremely fast, so it’s not totally feasible for field use. It would also be very hard for it to go wireless, but I had built that groundwork in so it could happen.

The one I’m working on now doesn’t require a computer as an intermediate, and is going to be totally wireless as from the start.

This morning I finished the handshake data exchange over xbee. Right now it’s just dimming a few LED’s but if you take a peek at the following code, it’s very expandable.

Here’s the working code:

 

Hey! This post was written a long time ago, but I'm leaving it up on the off-chance it may help someone, but proceed with caution. It may not be a good idea to blindly integrate this code or work into your project, but instead use it as a starting point.

Plane | Corrective Balancing Mechanism

First of all, here’s a video of this device in action.

 

So things are really starting to take shape with the plane (still unnamed…) and I’ve got a really solid framework for an auto-balancing system. Basically the program below maps the x value given from the ADXL335 to a value from 1-180 on the servo. A lot of this code is for debug, but that portion can be switched off.

Sorry for the lack of comments in this code, it’s pretty intuitive though, at it’s core its all about the map command.

Here’s a picture of what my desk looks like:

Here’s a picture of the fritzing document, which can be found: here

Thanks for reading!

Hey! This post was written a long time ago, but I'm leaving it up on the off-chance it may help someone, but proceed with caution. It may not be a good idea to blindly integrate this code or work into your project, but instead use it as a starting point.

Plane | Final Static Prototype [Documentation]

Let me preface this by saying that I am immensely proud of this work. The work up to here is very special and I can only hope that my work going forward is as good as this.

So I’m calling this the “Final Static Prototype” because it’s pretty damn complete for being prototype and it does not move. I intend on making a moving, non-flying prototype sometime in the future. Let’s start out with the video:

Now an explanation for each of the components starting with the controller.

It’s pretty much the same deal I’ve been using this entire time. The program works as follows.

1. The computer sends a delay value and a cycle number

2. The arduino receives that data

3. The arduino sends the debug switch value, the x and y values of the joystick and the pot value.

4. The program renders that information on the program.

Here’s the controller’s source:

Now for the output simulator (eventually the plane)

This works like the controller with the “handshake” protocol as described above, but it writes to the servos and then sends sensor values. Here’s that source:

The visual basic program which I’m calling “Vehicle Companion” can be found here in all of it’s glory. The picture below also shows the whole system.

Now all I need is the money to make this thing wireless because I’ve got a way to make it into a moving prototype using materials I already have. I’ll put a donate button somewhere on this website eventually if you want to help me out.

Thanks for reading.

Hey! This post was written a long time ago, but I'm leaving it up on the off-chance it may help someone, but proceed with caution. It may not be a good idea to blindly integrate this code or work into your project, but instead use it as a starting point.