Host Multiple Webservers Out Of One IP Address (reverse proxy) Using Ngnix

It’s easy enough to host a single website out of a residential internet connection. All you have to do is open up port 80 on your router and bind it to the local IP address of your server as follows:

But say you’re like me and have multiple domains and therefor want want to host content for mutliple domains on the same IP address like this:

Say you want to further complicate things further and have unique physical computers for hosting each site. The quickest and easiest way to do this (so I’ve found) is using a Ngnix Reverse Proxy.


The topology for accomplishing this looks a lot like this:

The ONLY things we need to deal with in this diagram is the Ngnix Server and the router. For my setup it is a virtual machine running Ubuntu 10.04 x64. Setting up the software is pretty simple as well. First we need to install Ngnix:

After that we need to add the configuration files for each server. The procedure for doing that is as follows. You need to do this for EACH server you add to the reverse proxy.

For this example I’ll be using example.com as the domain and xxx.xxx.x.xxx as the IP address on the local network of the machine I’d like to host example.com on.

Create the config with:

The create then fill it in:

Note the line

This limits the file size that can be transferred through the reverse proxy to the target server. If you are transferring larger files, you will need to increase this value, but 64M is more than enough for most applications.

From there, you need to “activate” the new redirect by symbolically linking it with a config in the enabled sites directory in Ngnix with:

Restart ngnix and we’re done!


Now to configure the router.
It’s pretty easy, all you need to do is forward port 80 on the router to the local IP address of the Ngnix server. On my router that looks like this

Where 192.168.1.217 is xxx.xxx.x.xxx in my example.

Thanks for reading and if you have any questions leave them in the comments.

PiPlanter 2 | Plant Update and Daughter Board Migration

First, a video:

I’ve worked very hard since my last update to move all of the hardware that interfaces the Raspberry Pi with the plants (GPIO, ADC etc) from on board the Raspberry Pi using the GIPO to a daughterboard based around an Arduino.

This has been a lot of work to accomplish, but as of about a week ago, the transition was completed in it’s entirety and everything is operating totally normally without using any GIPO on the Pi.

This provides a portability for the platform that I haven’t been able to achieve so far. As the name of the project suggests, I’ve only used a Raspberry Pi to drive all of the hardware so far as well as do everything with the software. This transition opens up the possibility of using any computer running linux to be able to drive a PiPlanter if they have the board.

I’ve outlined the “PiPlanter Hardware Specification” in the current block diagram for the project. So if you have these parts, you can make a PiPlanter. The protocol for communicating between host computer and the Arduino is outlined here. I’ve decided to go with plain text serial using a rudimentary handshake to handle the communication. Pretty much all computers have a serial port, and the Arduino is very good at dealing with it as well.

One of the next steps that I take in this project would to be to design and fabricate PCB’s for specifically for this. This is certainly going to be a challenge for me, but it’s nothing I can’t handle. This also gives me the opportunity to maybe start selling PiPlanters which is exciting. I might need to change the name for obvious reasons…

Here are some nice photos of the updated setup:


All of the code and documentation for this version of the PiPlanter can be found here.

I am going on break from school from today, December 18th 2014 to on or around January 14th 2015. Now that the PiPlanter isn’t at my house, I can’t access the network remotely and make changes to the code. The next month will be a good stress test of the new daughterboard infrastructure. Hopefully it all goes well.

Thanks for reading!