StripPi – Software Demo, Roadkill Electronics

I’m constantly loosing the remote for my RGB LED strip lights, and I have a few days for spring break, time to get hacking. Here’s a demo and explanation video:

I don’t mention it in the video, but the cool part of this project is how the different processes communicate with each other. Rather than interacting with the different processes through pipes, or something like stdin, I’ve decided to use a TCP websocket server:

StripPi High Level Diagram

Processes on the device send RGB values to the Strip Server via a TCP packet. This very very easy to implement, and almost all of the hard work is taken care of via the socketserver  module included in python3. This also allows for interactions with that main process (the StripPi Server process) to take place off of the Raspberry Pi as well. I plan on writing an Alexa integration for this project moving forward, and this should make that a lot easier.

The analog to digital conversion is handled by an MCP3008, exactly the same way as I did it here.

Thanks for reading, more soon.

Multiplexing Composite NTSC Video

This was one of those rare times where I had a hunch, followed it, and had a great result.

So for a project I’m working on for school, we have a robot with multiple composite video cameras onboard. We will be using those cameras seen on DIY drones or in simple security systems. We will be transmitting this video feed via a 5.8GHz video transmitter meant for a drone. We want the operator to be able to switch which feed they’re viewing at a given time, but we don’t want to have to use 3 transmitters and receivers. So to get around this, I thought we might just connect video feeds to a simple analog multiplexer I had laying around from a previous project and see if you could switch the feed that way. Turns out, you totally can. Here’s the eventual block diagram of this part of our project if you’re interested:

The following is the code running on the arduino. Remember, this isn’t doing anything special other than driving the mux:

Raspberry Pi Digital Hourglass

Trying to get the most out of a day has been big theme of my life lately, as I’m sure it is for many people. I’ve found that I always manage my time better when things are urgent; I’m considerably more productive when I have to be.

I want an ascetically pleasing way to be able to represent how much time is left in the day at a granular scale, like an hourglass. Watching individual seconds disappear will look cool and (hopefully) create that sense of urgency that I want to induce.

Technically, this is a really simple thing to accomplish thanks to python and pygame. Here’s a video of a proof of concept running on my laptop:

At the start of each day, the display is filled with squares at random locations, with a random color. As each second elapses, a square will vanish.

To make it easier to see for the video, I’ve made the squares much bigger than they will actually be for the final build. This is what the display looks like with the squares at their actual size:

The code really really simple, like less than 100 lines simple. Here’s how it works:

Here’s the version of the code running on my computer in the video:

Let’s walk through some of the design decisions of this code. The first thing that’s worth talking about is how the data for the squares is handled:

It’s just an object with no methods, and on initialization, all the parameters of the square (location and color) are generated randomly as opposed to just floating the raw numbers in arrays around (even though that’s basically what is happening). This let’s us fill the squares array very easily later on in the file here:

and here:

When it comes time to draw these squares, it also makes that pretty intuitive:

Again, very simple stuff, but worth it to talk about.

I’ll be back at my place that has the Raspberry Pi and display I would like to use for this project, so more on this then.

Thanks for reading!

The Maker Stack (Self-Hosted Server Configuration)

There are many maker/hackers out there like me that operate little blogs just like this one and would like to expand but spend absolutely no cash. This post is for that kind of person.

This is what my network looks like now for the diagram oriented:

Basically, this configuration allows me to host two websites (they happen to both be wordpress installations) with different url’s out of the same server on the same local network, sharing the same global IP address as well as host email accounts across all of the domains I own.

The backbone of this whole system is virtualbox controlled by phpvirtualbox. This is a preference thing. You could install each of these components on the same server but virtual machines are an easy way to keep things conceptually simple. All of the traffic from the web is ingested through a reverse proxy on a server running ngnix. It identifies where the user would like to end up at (using the url) and directs them to the proper hardware on the network.


Installation

I have done detailed posts on each part of this installation, I’ll glue it all together here.

  • First thing’s first, everything runs out of Ubuntu, particularly Ubuntu 12.04.3 LTS. To do any of this you will need a computer capable of running Ubuntu, this is my hardware configuration. To install Ubuntu, the official installation guide is a good place to start, if you have any trouble with it leave a comment.
  • Once you have Ubuntu, install virtualbox to host the virtual machines, and phpvirtualbox to headlessly (no need for a monitor or mouse and keyboard) control them. Instructions here.
  • Next you need to install Ubuntu inside of virtualbox on a virtual machine. Navigate to your installation of phpvirtualbox and click new in the top left.

  • In order to get our new virtual machine on the internet, we must bridge the virtual adapter in the vm with the physical one. This is very easy to do. Click the vm on the left, and then go into settings then into network. Set “Attached to:” to Bridged Adapter.

  •  Once Ubuntu is installed on your new virtual machine inside of phpvirtualbox running on your Ubuntu server (mouthful!), to make the whole thing work, we must install and configure a nginx as a reverse proxy server. Say a project of yours deserves its own website, since your already hosting a website out of your residential connection, you would have to pay to host somewhere else as well right? Wrong. I have written this guide to do this. Once this installation is done. Make sure that you assign a static IP address to this server (as well as all other VM’s you create) and forward your router’s port 80 to the nginx server. The port forwarding is specific to the router, if you have no clue how to do it, google “port forward nameofrouter”.
  • You will then have to point the DNS server with your Domain Name Registrar to your router’s global IP address. Obtaining this IP address is easy.

And the foundation is set! Now that you know how to install a virtual machine and you have a nginx reverse proxy up and running, you should point the proxy to things!

In my configuration, I point it at two different  I use this routine to do wordpress installations all the time. On my server, I run two VM’s with two wordpress installs. One of them is for this blog, and the other for another website of mine, www.blockthewind.com.

To get a simple email server up and running, follow this guide which goes a little more in depth on phpvirtualbox but results in a citadel email server. I decided to go with citadel because of how easy the installation was and how configurable it was through the GUI. I use email accounts hosted with citadel for addresses that I would use either once or infrequently. It’s free to make these addresses, but citadel is older and probably not as secure as it could be for highly sensitive data.


That’s it! Do you have any suggestions as to what every small-scale tech blogger should have on their server?

Thanks for reading!

Host Multiple Webservers Out Of One IP Address (reverse proxy) Using Ngnix

It’s easy enough to host a single website out of a residential internet connection. All you have to do is open up port 80 on your router and bind it to the local IP address of your server as follows:

But say you’re like me and have multiple domains and therefor want want to host content for mutliple domains on the same IP address like this:

Say you want to further complicate things further and have unique physical computers for hosting each site. The quickest and easiest way to do this (so I’ve found) is using a Ngnix Reverse Proxy.


The topology for accomplishing this looks a lot like this:

The ONLY things we need to deal with in this diagram is the Ngnix Server and the router. For my setup it is a virtual machine running Ubuntu 10.04 x64. Setting up the software is pretty simple as well. First we need to install Ngnix:

After that we need to add the configuration files for each server. The procedure for doing that is as follows. You need to do this for EACH server you add to the reverse proxy.

For this example I’ll be using example.com as the domain and xxx.xxx.x.xxx as the IP address on the local network of the machine I’d like to host example.com on.

Create the config with:

The create then fill it in:

Note the line

This limits the file size that can be transferred through the reverse proxy to the target server. If you are transferring larger files, you will need to increase this value, but 64M is more than enough for most applications.

From there, you need to “activate” the new redirect by symbolically linking it with a config in the enabled sites directory in Ngnix with:

Restart ngnix and we’re done!


Now to configure the router.
It’s pretty easy, all you need to do is forward port 80 on the router to the local IP address of the Ngnix server. On my router that looks like this

Where 192.168.1.217 is xxx.xxx.x.xxx in my example.

Thanks for reading and if you have any questions leave them in the comments.

Site has been down

You’re currently reading this via a virtual server running on top of this server, which is hosted out of my residence in southern Maine. For the most part, I generally enjoy the challenges and obstacles that come with self-hosting this website but it becomes very very annoying in cases where there is physically nothing I can do. Take these past two days for example.

Storm!

Sometimes it snows a foot in an hour and the power goes out for a few days. Not much I can do about it, sorry for the inconvenience. If it’s any consultation, Twitter isn’t hosted out of their parent’s house and you can follow me there where I typically post if my site is up or down.

Thanks for reading!

PiPlanter 2 | Installing a 3rd Instance of the PiPlanter

Ten days ago I finished installing the third ever instance of the PiPlanter in a lab in the physics department at my college! I went with the the rack mounted design as I did this past summer, and am going to be growing Basil, Cilantro and Parsley as opposed to tomatoes. Here are some photos of the new setup:


There are a few major changes that come with this new instance. The first and foremost being the addition of LED grow lights. I’ll post a new version of the code with LED routines included when I think it’s polished enough. The second difference is that a tray of soil is being used as the growth medium for the plants as opposed to pots of soil. This will more than likely be the configuration I use moving forward. The final difference is the actual type of plants being grown. I’m moving away from tomatoes because there will be nothing to pollinate the flowers in the winter as well as the fact that I cook a lot and it will be neat to have spices that I can use on a day to day basis.

The first 10 days of growth has gone well. Here’s a video of them growing so far:

Thanks for reading!

PiPlanter 2 | DIY Lite Version Release!

Since I returned to college the PiPlanter has been running without me having to do any maintenance on it at all. The plants are still alive and growing and all processes associated with the PiPlanter are still going. I figure now is a good a time as any to bring together all of the work I’ve done to till this point in one concise post.

This does NOT mean I’m done working on future versions of the PiPlanter. I’ll hopefully write another post stating goals for the future sometime soon. Now onto the build tutorial.


 

The Hardware

 

First, the hardware of the project. A good place to start would be the parts list:

In the previous version of the PiPlanter, I didn’t have a concrete parts list for the project. Hopefully I’ll be able to keep this spreadsheet updated if the project changes. A lot of these components are mix and match, you could use pretty much any pump (The math for volumetric pumping is done with this pump) or any tubing or any power supply that can do 12v and 5v. A computer PSU would work great as well.

This is the hookup guide for the system:

(Thanks to tamps for the help!)

The two sets of header blocks are to be replaced by the moisture sensors, and the motor replaced with the pump.

For a physical configuration, I’ve found through multiple times doing this that mounting it on a wire rack works the best as seen here:

Edit (10/19/2014) Here is the same group of plants two months later without any direct human interaction. They grew from the light in the window and used up all of the water in the reservoir which was totally filled before I left.

To distribute the water to the plants, attach the vinyl tubing to the outflow of the pump and seal off the other end of the outflow tube. Run the tubing along the plants and drill holes wherever you’d like the water to exit.

You’ll also need to install the camera module in the Pi and point it wherever you’d like the frame of the photo to be.

 

The Software

As a preface, I’d like to at first say that this software was written entirely by me. I’ve never had any formal training in programming of any kind, so if there are obvious flaws with my code please let me know. That being said, I’ve found that this system is very effective and has worked for me and kept my plants alive for months.

All of this runs off of a base install of raspian on a raspberry pi model b.

There three major parts to the software. First, the prerequisites:

You’ll need to enable SPI on your Pi in order to use the MCP3008 ADC. Do this by running the following commands:

Comment out the spi-bcm2708 line so it looks like this:

Then run this to make it more permanent.

And finally reboot your Pi with:

Then the php code that renders the pChart graph. More details for installing pChart here and officially here.

And now the star of the show, the python script:

Before running, make sure you make the following changes to the script:

You’ll need set up access to twitter API’s, seen here. You’ll need to input your information about your twitter app into into 331-334 of this script.

You’ll need to input information about your YouTube account on line 429

On line 473 you’ll need to input your mysql information.

 

Output Demos

The PiPlanter is very connected. It renders graphs of data, takes images and renders timelapse videos.

Here’s a standard tweet showing the plants:

Here’s a tweet showing a day’s worth of data in  a  graph render:

Here’s a tweet showing a week’s worth of data in a graph render:

Here’s a timelapse video of three days:

Follow @PiPlanter_Bot for updates on my plants.

That’s pretty much it! Please feel free to modify this code for any use you’d like.

All of my research on this project can be found here.

Thanks for reading, and please leave a comment if you like my work!

PiPlanter 2 | Updating Dependencies

In addition to the directions in this post on getting the ADC working, the following must be run to get the current version of the PiPlanter up and running.